Blogging’s 10th Birthday

I was reading Scoble’s post about his 7th year of blogging and some of the issues he’s had locating his old post that have gotten lost for several reasons.  I know that I had some blog posts that I didn’t have in my WordPress database that I’ve lost, but then Scoble’s post reminded me of the Internet Archive.

After a bit of searching, I’ve now got several posts up from 2000 and 2002.  In 2001, I wasn’t really running anything that can be called a blog, it was more of a collection of random links.

Anyhow, my first blog post on my site now takes us back to May 14, 2000.  I really wish that I had taken screenshots of prior designs as well – the Internet Archive doesn’t typically capture graphics and such, so some of the older shots look pretty bad.

Oh well.  The exercise was interesting.  I knew that along the way I’ve run (in reverse chronological order) WordPress, Movable Type, Drupal and my static HTML page with dates and entries manually posted.  However, I totally forgot that in 2000 I ran Slashcode.

Anyhow, back to the title of the post. Scoble points out that the term ‘weblog’ was coined by Jorn Barger 10 years ago on December 17, 1997.  Happy 10th, blogs!

I love some of Jorn’s original principles for blogging:

2. You can certainly include links to your original thoughts, posted elsewhere … but if you have more original posts than links, you probably need to learn some humility.

3. If you spend a little time searching before you post, you can probably find your idea well articulated elsewhere already.

I think for #2 that times have changed a bit, and I agree with #3.  Matter of fact, I’m sure someone’s already posted that #2 is wrong.

More Fun with Comcast

I’m hereby dubbing Comcast the "masters of condescending customer service."

About two weeks ago (November 26, in fact), I made the trek to our local Comcast office to drop off our HD-DVR and tell them to kill my cable TV service.  The lady at the store was friendly, took the HD-DVR, and gave me a receipt indicating they took possession of the equipment.

I should’ve been suspicious that the transaction was so easy.

Today, I got my December through January statement, and, sure enough, they’re still billing me for TV services.  I gave them a buzz, told them the error of their ways, and was transferred to their customer retention department.  I believe I’ve blogged before about how much I hate customer retention departments, but I can’t find prior blog posts about that for the life of me.

Now, the lady in customer retention first asks me why I’m discontinuing service.  I gave her the honest answer: switched to satellite, they had channels and HD options I wanted that Comcast didn’t.  This wasn’t good enough for her.  She rambled on about how in "side-by-side tests" Comcast’s HD signals were better than satellite.  Well, true as that may be (though I can’t tell a difference), I will say that in my side-by-side test that FoodTV in HD looks better than FoodTV on Comcast, which isn’t HD.  Oh, and NASA TV isn’t available on Comcast.

She goes on processing my order, puts me on hold for a few minutes, and then comes back saying that I should’ve known the TV wasn’t being canceled since a tech wasn’t scheduled to come out to my house.  Well, for one, how am I as a consumer supposed to be privy to that?  Second… I’ll get to second in a moment, just remember that no tech was scheduled originally.

Back on hold I go, and she comes back and "graciously" has set my close date to November 26, so I’ll get a credit back to me for the time I haven’t used it.  She tells me that "what I’ve gotten myself into" is a loss of "freedom of choice", since satellite doesn’t have On Demand (it has PPV and a streaming video thing, thankyouvermuch) and a contact whose price can change anytime.  I tell her that my contract is locked for 18 months, I’m well aware of what can happen afterwards, and how ironic it is that she told me that since Comcast just increased their rates here.  We’re done.

Oh, remember that part about not scheduling a tech to come out?  She didn’t schedule one to come out either, so apparently it’s not really needed after all.